EPA chief Scott Pruitt announced the demise of the Clean Power Plan.

Revoking the Clean Power Plan Isn’t Environmental Surrender

On Monday, Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, announced that the EPA would set about repealing the Clean Power Plan. The end of the Obama-era policy has been a long time coming, but its final death rattle has triggered a wave of anti-energy protests from both private organizations and state governments.

While these protests boil up, however, individual states have taken it upon themselves to pioneer their own environmental future. You know, rather than moan and groan in idle.

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A Tale of Two Counties: Colorado’s Mesa and Boulder Communities Show the Diversity of Fracking

Colorado is the front line for fracking in the United States. In a country that seems evenly divided on the practice of hydraulic fracturing, Colorado is a good microcosm of the argument. The state is rich in shale and oil reserves, which means fracking is a particularly relevant topic. More importantly, however, Colorado is home to an incredibly diverse array of people who represent an equally diverse amount of perspectives.

And as any Colorado resident can tell you, the people who live there are also not shy about voicing those opinions. In the wake of a federal court ruling that has revoked a series of Obama-era regulations that banned fracking on federal lands, two Colorado counties are working quickly to make sure that their voices are heard.

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, via Wikimedia Commons

Venezuela’s Switch to the Yuan: Scary or Just Sad?

If the United States government believed that Venezuela would crumble in the wake of a fresh round of sanctions, it was sorely mistaken. Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro responded to the sanctions by taking a drastic action on Friday, when the nation published its oil prices in the common currency of China, the yuan.

In case the decision wasn’t a direct enough stab at the US, Maduro doubled down on the decision by calling it an attempt to free Venezuela from the “tyranny of the US dollar.” It’s a bold move from a country that does a whole lot of oil and gas business with the United States. Maduro’s shift is enough to make some industry experts stop and take notice.

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What Do Rising Gas Prices Mean for the Entire US Economy?

In the space of a week, Hurricane Harvey has flooded miles of real estate, displaced thousands of Texans, and shut down more than ten percent of the United States’ ability to refine and extract oil and gas. Even if you’re not being bombarded with wind and rain, the impact of Hurricane Harvey will still be felt for some time to come. In fact, the price of a gallon of gas has climbed 18 cents since Hurricane Harvey struck in late August.

That price hike is bad enough for the average driver, but a climbing gas price is just the catalyst for several more troublesome economic repercussions. Here’s what the experts are forecasting.

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Tropical Storm Harvey Oil and Gas Impact Will Be Felt for Months to Come

Freak weather patterns have turned Tropical Storm Harvey into one of the most destructive storms in the history of the United States. People have been left homeless, thousands of gallons of water have been dumped across 44 counties in Texas, and the state’s oil and gas industry has been stopped in its tracks. What’s worse, the National Weather Service predicts that Harvey might gain renewed strength as it drifts back out to the Gulf of Mexico.

Initially classified a Category 4 hurricane as it made landfall on Friday afternoon, Hurricane Harvey has since been downgraded to Tropical Storm Harvey. That doesn’t seem to have diminished the already tangible impact on the people of Texas. It’s not over, either. Harvey’s long term effects could be felt by the whole of the world.

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Geology Might Do the Job of the United Kingdom’s Anti-Fracking Protestors

After a particularly pitched fight over the future of fracking in the UK, one geologist might burst the fracking bubble with a single incendiary report.

According to Prof. John Underhill of Heriot-Watt University, the presumed 1,300 trillion cubic feet of gas that lies underneath the United Kingdom may not be as accessible as previously hinted. That’s great news for anti-fracking protestors who have proven a willingness to get their hands dirty in the fight to keep fracking out of the UK.

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Jonah Energy’s NPL Natural Gas Development Project Inches Toward Completion

The Wyoming Bureau of Land Management is now allowing public comment on Jonah Energy’s next ambitious undertaking, the Normally Pressurized Lance natural gas project. The proposed development could help stimulate the state’s economy with a plethora of new jobs and an infusion of cash.

As every new oil and gas project must, however, Jonah Energy’s NPL project is drawing criticism from anti-fracking protestors.

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A Pocket Guide to the Unrest in Venezuela and What It Means for US Oil and Gas

On July 31, the Trump administration responded to growing political turmoil in the South American country of Venezuela by initiating a series of sanctions against President Nicolás Maduro. Once a cherished trading partner for the United States, Venezuela is now looking at a period of political and economic strife for the foreseeable future.

But what exactly is going on in Venezuela? And what does the chaos mean for the United States oil and gas industry?

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Nigeria Is Working to Reestablish Its Credibility On the World’s Oil and Gas Stage

It’s been a tough road for Nigeria as the oil-rich country has struggled to build up its energy industry. In spite of the nation’s ample resources and apparent willingness to commit themselves to oil and gas extraction, a small pocket of corruption has plagued the African nation’s development. Now, after years in the grip of a handful of scam artists, Nigeria is working its way back from the brink, and economic stability might be right behind it.

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